A continuing look at equine digestion, focusing on the activity and function of the small intestine.

As a veterinarian, I believe the severe contracted tendon syndrome (i.e. foal tendons not relaxing) has multiple causes and cannot be singularly related to a single mineral or vitamin deficiency (e.g. Se & vitamin E).  The following are some thoughts related to newborn...

February 12, 2020

Down the bottom of the stomach is the body and the pyloric region. This is where a lot of what’s commonly referred to as the digestive juices are retained. These are the acids and enzymes designed to start breaking down the food chemically. The pH in that area is about...

February 12, 2020

Looking at the equine digestive system in its completeness, we are faced with some unique factors that we need to take into consideration, when choosing the right feed for the horse...

Ovulation cannot be predicted only by oestrus symptoms. Accordingly, oestrus does not guarantee ovulation. The most common technique used to detect ovulation is rectal palpation combined with ultrasound scanning. These two are the ‘gold standard’ for a reproductive ve...

Ovulation occurs usually 24-48 hours before the end of oestrus, but the precise detection of the ovulation is challenging without an ultrasound scanner or a sensitive hand, well-trained in palpation. The precise detection of the ovulation is the critical point of the c...